Monthly Archives: March 2012

Novelty seeking in honey bees and humans, same mechanisms

Individuals behave differently. But what are the molecular mechanisms that are responsible for these differences in behavior? Scientists searched for an answer by comparing gene expression in the brain between honey bees that seek novelty and those which do not.

Novelty seeking in honey bees and humans, same mechanisms

Individuals behave differently. But what are the molecular mechanisms that are responsible for these differences in behavior? Scientists searched for an answer by comparing gene expression in the brain between honey bees that seek novelty and those which do not.

Mammals were doing good long before the dinosaurs said goodbye

The common view is that the first mammals were tiny, nocturnal insectivores and they only evolved in the vast array of ecological and morphological forms we know today once the dinosaurs cleared the scene. But it seems it’s not quite

Mammals were doing good long before the dinosaurs said goodbye

The common view is that the first mammals were tiny, nocturnal insectivores and they only evolved in the vast array of ecological and morphological forms we know today once the dinosaurs cleared the scene. But it seems it’s not quite

How memory becomes hazy with marijuana

Marijuana is known to impair memory. But until now the mechanism through which marijuana affects memory was unknown. Researchers took a closer look at the brain of rats and mice to find out. Researchers injected rats with a cannabinoid, the

How memory becomes hazy with marijuana

Marijuana is known to impair memory. But until now the mechanism through which marijuana affects memory was unknown. Researchers took a closer look at the brain of rats and mice to find out. Researchers injected rats with a cannabinoid, the

Research on the cancer that is killing Taz makes further progress

Twenty-five years. That may be the time left before the Tasmanian devil becomes extinct, taken away by a fatal and contagious cancer. The devil facial tumor disease (DFTD) was first detected in northeastern Tasmania in 1996. Since then the disease

Research on the cancer that is killing Taz makes further progress

Twenty-five years. That may be the time left before the Tasmanian devil becomes extinct, taken away by a fatal and contagious cancer. The devil facial tumor disease (DFTD) was first detected in northeastern Tasmania in 1996. Since then the disease